Russian Investigators' Report on Cheonan Sinking 'Inconclusive'

      September 07, 2010 10:00

      Russian investigators submitted their final report on the sinking of the South Korean Navy corvette Cheonan to the National Security Council, an agency under presidential supervision, the RIA Novosti news agency reported Saturday. The news agency did not say what their conclusion was.

      The Komsomolskaya Pravda and the Rossiyskaya Gazeta said the investigators failed to come up with a definitive conclusion.

      They said the only thing that is certain is that an external shock sank the ship in March, killing 46 sailors. Russia's Foreign Ministry will deliver the report to South Korea.

      Since major issues in Russia are open to the tightly controlled media a few days after decisions are made, it appears that Russian President Dmitry Medvedev has already received the report on the Cheonan sinking.

      The Rossiyskaya Gazeta pointed out that President Lee Myung-bak is to visit Russia to attend the Yaroslavl Global Policy Forum on Thursday through Saturday, and the two leaders will likely discuss the sinking of the Cheonan at a summit on Friday.

      The forum, which was founded by Medvedev, invited Lee as a keynote speaker. About 500 government officials and academics from about 20 countries will attend, the only other head of government being Italian Prime Minister Silvio Berlusconi.

      Lee is visiting Russia despite other scheduled meetings with Medvedev on the sidelines of the Asia-Europe Meeting in Belgium in October and the G20 Summit in Seoul in November.

      Moscow's recent relations with Seoul have been cool because Russia declined to accept the conclusions of an international inquiry that blamed the sinking squarely on North Korea, a Russian ally.

      Russia sent a group of four naval experts to South Korea in June, where they probed the sinking by inspecting the ship's debris and collecting materials.

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