Beijing Admits Blocking Korean Messaging Apps

The Chinese government has admitted blocking some functions of Korean mobile messaging apps KakaoTalk and Line due to concerns that they could be of use to "terrorism."

Since early last month, KakaoTalk and Line users in China have experienced problems sending messages or gaining membership access.

Lee Jin-kyu at the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning said China informed it about a month later that it had blocked "some foreign messaging apps through which terrorism-related information" was being circulated.

He said other apps are also being blocked, including Didi, Talk Box and Vower.

Chinese authorities claimed that terrorist groups were distributing bomb-making instructions and other information via mobile messaging and video-sharing sites.

Beijing presented no concrete evidence.

Asked whether China is trying to put the brakes on any emerging market for Korean messaging apps in China, Lee said, "There aren't that many people in China using KakaoTalk or Line, and the majority owner of Kakao Talk's Chinese operations is local Internet company Tencent, so that's not very likely."

The ministry agreed to negotiate with the Chinese government to resolve the matter as soon as possible.

englishnews@chosun.com / Aug. 08, 2014 12:19 KST