China Publishes Confessions of Japanese War Criminals

The Chinese government on Thursday published the confessions of Japanese war criminals convicted for atrocities during World War II in which they admit the forced mobilization of Korean and Chinese women as sex slaves for Japanese soldiers.

The release of the documents coincided with a visit to Seoul by Chinese President Xi Jinping, who along with his host and counterpart Park Geun-hye carefully avoided any reference to a Japanese campaign to whitewash the country's wartime atrocities.

China's State Archives Administration posted the documents on its website. The confessions were written by Japanese criminals convicted in China after the war. One of the documents, handwritten by Keiku Suzuki, one of the top Japanese commanders, states that he "murdered 5,470 Chinese people and destroyed 18,229 houses" from 1934 to 1945.

Suzuki also admits to creating a so-called "comfort station" in Anhui Province in 1941 and luring Korean and Chinese women and turning them into sex slaves the following year.

The State Archives Administration said it would post more documents over the next 45 days.

Hua Liming, deputy director of the State Archives Administration, said the handwritten confessions of another 1,017 Japanese war criminals amount to 200,000 pages.

englishnews@chosun.com / Jul. 04, 2014 10:19 KST