How to Shake Off World Cup Fatigue

World Cup fever has gripped Korea, but it entails a substantial amount of fatigue due to the time difference with Brazil, which means that many matches are held in the small hours of the morning.

The month-long series of matches usually take place between 1 a.m. and 7 a.m. Korean time. One or two nights of cheering until the wee hours of the morning should not take a huge toll on the body, but fatigue could build up if this pattern continues.

The 1-1 draw between Korea and Russia took place at 7 a.m. here, while the remaining two matches in the early stage of the World Cup are scheduled at between 4 a.m. to 5 a.m. This has prompted many fans here to opt to stay up all night rather than risk missing the game after catching a few winks.

Sleep deprivation can lead to severe fatigue, reduce concentration and cause headaches. A lack of sleep also causes bodies to excrete the stress hormone cortisol which drives the appetite, contributing to obesity.

The best way to prevent excretions of cortisol is to get plenty of sleep. If you find it hard to go to bed early, drinking a cup of warm milk or tea helps. Another way to get some a good rest is to take a warm shower before bed.

Eating snacks makes it harder to sleep at night, since the body is busy digesting the food. So it is best to cut down on the food and drinking. If you did not get a good night's sleep because of a World Cup match, it helps to get some shut-eye in the lunch break.

Drinking too much coffee during the day can make it difficult for you to fall asleep at night.

Eating plenty of fruit and vegetables is also helpful in relieving fatigue. They are packed with vitamin C which has been proven to be effective in recovering from fatigue. Vitamin C is an antioxidant that suppresses oxidation due to stress and helps the body produce carnitine, a substance that helps the body turn fat into energy.

englishnews@chosun.com / Jun. 20, 2014 08:31 KST