Pope Invites Muslim, Jewish Leaders to Vatican

Pope Francis met with Israel's Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and President Shimon Peres Monday as he wrapped up his three-day trip to the Middle East.

Netanyahu told the pope why he believes Israel needed to build a separation barrier around the West Bank city of Bethlehem.

The Israeli prime minister said that when incitement and terror against Israel ends, there will not be a need for the wall, where Pope Francis stopped and prayed on Sunday.

Peres thanked the pope for making efforts to restart the stalled Israeli-Palestinian peace process. Pope Francis invited Peres and Palestinian President Mahmoud Abbas to come to the Vatican in June to pray for peace and both men accepted his invitation.

Also Monday, the pope prayed and laid a wreath at Jerusalem's Yad Vashem museum, which commemorates the six million Jews killed during the Holocaust.

He also placed a wreath on the grave of the father of modern Israel, Theodor Herzl. He also met with the two chief rabbis of Jerusalem.

Pope Francis meets with the Mufti of Jerusalem Muhammad Ahmad Hussein (left) and Abdul Azeem Salhab, head of the Waqef supreme court, near the Dome of the Rock Mosque on May 26, 2014. /AP Pope Francis meets with the Mufti of Jerusalem Muhammad Ahmad Hussein (left) and Abdul Azeem Salhab, head of the Waqef supreme court, near the Dome of the Rock Mosque on May 26, 2014. /AP

Earlier, the pope met with the Grand Mufti of Jerusalem, Sheikh Mohammad Hussein at the Haram al-Sharif, also known as the Dome of the Rock. Speaking at the shrine, he said a visit to the Holy Land would not be complete without a meeting with the Muslim communities.

Speaking in Latin, the pope made a heartfelt plea to all people and communities who look to Abraham, calling on all to respect and love one another as brothers and sisters. He also called for those present to learn to understand the sufferings of others.

The pontiff also prayed at the Wailing Wall.

The Rabbi of the Western Wall, Shmuel Rabinovitch, said for too many years, religion was a source of division. He said that from the wall, which is sacred to the pope, the rabbi, and to millions more around the globe, he called on people of all religions to fight hatred and anti-Semitism.

On Sunday evening, Pope Francis met with Orthodox ecumenical leader, Patriarch Bartholomew, at the Church of the Holy Sepulcher, the site where many believe Jesus Christ was crucified and buried.

Standing as pilgrims in these holy places, we remember in our prayers the entire Middle East, so frequently and lamentably marked by acts of violence and conflict, said Francis. He said we do not forget the many people in the world who are suffering from war, poverty, hunger and persecution.

Patriarch Bartholomew lamented what he called racial discrimination and religious extremism in contemporary society.

VOA News / May 27, 2014 08:03 KST