Majority of Japanese Oppose Troop Deployment Abroad

More than half of Japanese people oppose plans by their government to assert the country's right to so-called collective self-defense, which would allow Tokyo to deploy troops abroad if an ally is in some way under threat.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe last Thursday vowed to seek a new interpretation of the country's pacifist postwar constitution to assert the right to the collective self-defense.

But in a poll of 1,035 people by the Mainichi Shimbun on Saturday and Sunday, 54 percent of respondents opposed the move, with only 39 percent in favor.

Opponents were mostly concerned about the possibility of Japan's involvement in a war with 71 percent. Only 25 percent are not worried.

Most of the respondents considered China, with which Japan is in dispute over the Senkaku or Diaoyu Islands, a considerable threat.

Some 83 percent agreed with the statement that China is a threat to Japan's security.

englishnews@chosun.com / May 20, 2014 13:12 KST