Poverty Means Fewer Visits from Kids for Elderly

      November 26, 2013 08:25

      Parents in Korea apparently need more money if they want to see their children often in their twilight years. Studies have found that the poorer the parents are, the less often they are visited by their grown-up offspring.

      A survey in 2011 by the Korea Institute for Health and Social Affairs found a correlation between the wealth of elderly parents and the frequency with which their children visit them.

      Among those in the top 20-percent income bracket, 38 percent met one of their children at least once a week, while 19.5 percent received visits from their grandchildren with the same degree of frequency.

      But the figures were lower for those in the bottom 20-percent income bracket. Some 28 percent were visited by their children at least once a week, while just 8.5 percent saw their grandchildren as often.

      Back in 2007, Chung Jae-ki, a sociology professor at Seoul's Soongsil University, compared surveys on 34,544 people in 15 OECD member countries including Japan, Korea, the U.K. and the U.S.

      He found that Korea was the only country to show a relationship between the wealth of elderly parents and the frequency of visits by their children. The frequency doubled with every additional a percent of income, according to his findings.

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