N.Korean Aluminum Shipment to Burma Foiled

The Japanese government confiscated what appeared to be North Korean aluminum alloy bars from a Singaporean cargo ship at the end of August, the Asahi Shimbun reported Saturday. They were apparently bound for Burma and could have been used in centrifuges for uranium enrichment.

The Wan Hai 313 belonging to a Taiwanese shipping company docked in Tokyo Port. The paper said authorities confiscated 50 metal pipes and 15 high-specification aluminum alloy bars marked "DPRK" for North Korea, "at least some of them offering the high strength needed in centrifuges for a nuclear weapons program."

Prior to U.S. President Barack Obama's visit to Burma on Nov. 19, the Burmese government pledged to sever military ties with North Korea and open up for nuclear inspection. North Korea makes hundreds of millions of dollars a year by exporting armaments.

The cargo was initially on a different ship in Dalian, China on July 27 and moved to the Wan Hai 313 in Shekou, China on Aug. 9. It was to reach Burma via Malaysia on Aug 15, but the ship entered Tokyo Port on Aug. 22 at the request of the U.S. government.

The aluminum alloy bars were exported by a company based in Dalian, which said it did so at the request of another company. The newspaper wrote, "Authorities concluded that the shipment originated in North Korea because the bars were found to be inscribed 'DPRK,' although investigators were unable to confirm the origin from cargo documents or from the ship's crew, the sources said."

englishnews@chosun.com / Nov. 26, 2012 12:56 KST