N.Korean TV Viewers Favor American Shows

Young North Koreans apparently prefer American soaps and films to South Korean ones, and they can now watch both easily. A defector who gave his name as Kim (43) and used to sell TV sets in the North said, "Used color TVs imported from China have both PAL and NTSC options, so there's no problem receiving South Korean TV signals," even in remote South Hamgyong Province.

North Korea and China use the PAL format to receive TV signals, while South Korea and Japan use the NTSC format. Some European countries and the Middle East favor SECAM. Most models manufactured after the 1990s allow users to shift formats.

"In South Hamgyong Province, only a few households are able to capture TV signals, but reception is quite good in Hwanghae or South Pyongan provinces," Kim said. "People there look forward to the evenings when dramas are broadcast." He said North Koreans also enjoy watching news and current events programs as well and power their TVs with their car batteries during power outages.

Another defector surnamed Yoo (40), who used to sell DVDs in the North and came to South Korea late last year, said North Koreans have grown tired of South Korean TV soaps with their stereotypical plots. "Nowadays, 'Rambo 4,' '007 Casino Royale,' and other American action films or TV dramas like 'Prison Break' are popular," she added.

According to Yoo, South Korean TV soaps like "Winter Sonata," "All In" or "Autumn in My Heart" were popular in the early 2000s, while "Jewel in the Palace" and other historical dramas grew popular in the late 2000s. Recently, action movies are gaining more attention.

North Koreans also prefer American movies to Korean ones. "Practically everyone knows 'Titanic.'" The movie classic "Gone with the Wind" is popular among upper-class North Koreans in Pyongyang, while young people enjoy action films. "DVDs of American movies or TV dramas fetched the highest prices," she said. "But now USBs with American TV programs are more popular than DVDs."

englishnews@chosun.com / Dec. 18, 2010 08:37 KST